Red Ink and Rewrites Too

Duplicates online comments, to keep track.

Archive for May 2007

GPS finds former military sites in the US

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Sept. 30, 2005

I’ve enjoyed your site (U.S. Coastal Artillery Photographs: Pictures of Former Coast Artillery Sites in the United States) to it from Devils Slide, CA after years ago a friend said they bathe there, also Gray Whale Cove and being from Long Island I wanted to see some of the sites in Google Earth. However, I missed some of the ones I’d like to see more of, not in any order, the forts on: Plum Island; documentation on Gardiners Rock to the north of Gardiners Island; Great Gull Island emplacements (at least one 16″ and another battery there next to the Little Gull Island lighthouse; more of “what the heck were these?”, i.e., the scuttled ships creating a breakwater between Friars Head and Roanoke Point on Long Island’s north shore, on Long Island Sound; and of course, though there’s a lot of info online, Davids Island, New Rochelle, NY.

If you have time, that manhole at Montauk Point (which I have been to a number of times, and with the Suffolk County Archaeological Association, connected to some of the research on the properties taken from the Montaukett natives in a Federal ruling of 1910 (probably in the “Tweed Courthouse” in NYC City Hall Park where in 1999 I helped delimit burials mostly associated with the “First Almshouse”) was it actually an entrance/exit to the tower?

Also check out the still standing Miller Field observation tower (also a NIKE missile repair center, the production of batteries for required an EPA remediation in the West Point Foundry Cove, Cold Spring, NY I was involved with, finding the prototype for the 10″ “Swamp Angel” platform patented by R.P. Parrott, used in the bombardment of Charleston, SC in the Civil War, which exploded, and investigated by the Franklin Institute and Congress) on Staten Island part of the Gateway National Park, NY which looks a lot like the observation “disguised” as cottages and other buildings that you show. I was testing 6 miles of waterfront on Staten Island for an Army Corps of Engineers flood control study for containments and walls with Panamerican Consultants, Inc. of Buffalo, NY a few years ago. It is said to be the first automated firing system in the country for a coastal battery that does not exist today? Maybe you might want to look into it.

In 1980, through a cloud of dust from Mt. St. Helens, I traveled to work in Skagway, Alaska, a railhead into the interior on narrow gauge railroad, that year the first actual road opened up to Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada. As a railhead was there any harbor fortifications, observation towers, etc., ever there or on the Lynne Canal it’s harbor is on as there were at Sitka, Alaska?

Finally, reading that Yale University had a group of pilots and trainees on the Great South Bay in Mastic, NY, near the William Floyd Manor (signer of the “Declaration of Independence”) part of the Fire Island National Seashore now, where I worked with the NPS in getting it ready for the public with clearance archaeology, and also attended a public hearing on behalf of the Suffolk County Archaeological Association for the creation of the National Seashore) in the 1930’s and there was also a shore battery gun there that used to fire at Fire Island, leaving what the writer said were deadly swirling holes in the water in the Great South Bay, maybe someone should review the entire military history of Long Island, starting with Suffolk County, not done to my knowledge.

(Sent to its webmaster, a woman underwater archaeologist at Stony Brook University and a woman historical archaeologist who worked for the NPS in Alaska.)

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Written by georgejmyersjr

05/30/2007 at 6:01 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Beam me down Mr. Scott…

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I was on a crew recently using a Thales GPS handheld unit (Thales Navigation, Inc. now part of the “Magellen” brand named after the circimnavigator of the earth who perished April 27, 1521, a day that occurred during the fieldwork using it at Quantico, VA for a proposed tree harvest to aid “Marine One” and other air traffic’s radar signatures) which can also be attached to an antenna worn on a belt that receives “Differential GPS” NMEA “beacon” signals. These “beacon” signals will be expanded in the coming years and are more accurate than LORAN C in cloudy weather and storms mostly as aids to navigation. The small antenna can either have a cable or is WiFi with the handheld computer which was running “MobileMapper Office” software which held color ESRI “shape files” for transect area layouts used by one of the crew members, familiar with forest survey in the Pacific Northwest. WAAS used in aircraft usually requires line of sight I thought I read.

Unfortunately the listed “experimental” beacon at Alexandria, Virginia was not on line, which would have helped (the unit can find them automatically) and the Annapolis, MD beacon was used a little further away (with the city of Washington, D.C. in between). The trees there are so large and tall I imagine a few months later would have provided even more interference. Ironically the: “…centralized Command and Control unit is USCG Navigation Center, based in Alexandria, VA. The USCG has carried over its NDGPS duties after the transition from the Department of Transportation to the Department of Homeland Security. There are 82 currently broadcasting NDGPS sites in the US network, with plans for up to 128 total sites to be online within the next 15 years.” (Wikipedia “Differential GPS”). It was an interesting unit my first encounter with one.

Posted to: “ACRA-L is a public listserv supported by the American Cultural Resources Association (ACRA), a non-profit trade association, for the use of the cultural resource management community. You do not need to belong to ACRA to subscribe to this list. As a result, opinions expressed on the list do not necessarily represent the views of ACRA or of its members.”

Written by georgejmyersjr

05/30/2007 at 4:32 am

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Martha Washington’s Runaway Slave, Ona Judge Staines

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George Washington’s slave escaped Virginia to freedom in New Hampshire

NH BLACK HISTORY

First lady Martha Washington enslaved more Africans than any woman of her time. When Ona (Oney) Judge, Martha’s body slave, escaped from Mount Vernon in 1796, she came to Seacoast, New Hampshire. Her amazing story is told her[e] by researcher Evelyn Gerson for SeacoastNH.com

Written by georgejmyersjr

05/28/2007 at 1:51 pm

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New Surgeon General

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This reminds me of the story of the George W. Bush report (within 6 months of the current President’s birthday) on file in the State of Texas for “practicing medicine without a license” charge on a reduced drug charge apparently that could not be corroborated, verified or negated without further research and investigation, quite a while ago, before 1994, before Oklahoma City and Waco when the President was elected Governor of Texas. Merely a coincidence or a truly “hot potato” that perhaps AG Gonzo knows about, he was the President’s legal council when he was called to jury duty there during his term as President in Texas, in a “stripper case”.

Newsvine – Bush’s pick for Surgeon General: killed 6 patients, embezzled $20M from church, hates gays, loves republicans

Written by georgejmyersjr

05/28/2007 at 2:01 am

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Brian Williams at Slate: TV Club: Talking Television

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Subject:
RE: Lincoln Logs

From:
GeorgeJMyersJr-2

Date:
May 25 2007 12:05AM

One company, who does museums and the US Open, Restaurant Associates had a theme franchise “Zum Zum” that made use of American franks, with three grill types, a regular, a “bauernwurst” (farmer) and a bratwurst on seeded rolls and hot potato salad from a steam table. It was supposed to be Bavarian fast-food and served with “Hell” and “Dunkel” beer (light and dark) in all the places it was except the one I worked, in a mall staffed mostly by a “kiddie corps” (Washington Square in NYC, the Met-Life (Pan Am) Building had helicopters land on it, and other locations) along with a sandwich board, soup and other stranger “German” foods Sulze (“head cheese”) Tilsit cheese, Westphalia ham, etc. The steel plates never broke. Today the small “Zum Zum” is a clock shop, started by a Rolex technician, and a very annoying advertising campaign from the Mazda car company of Hiroshima, Japan, mein freudin(?). I was a cook and a night manager of one.

Written by georgejmyersjr

05/25/2007 at 4:15 am

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There be whales, captain…

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A few years ago a whale beached on southern Long Island and a fellow from the North Wind Undersea Institute on City Island in the borough of the Bronx built a harness to save the whale that became known as “Feisty”. Often whales, once beached are towed tail first and drowned by well-meaning people. He invented a harness that would tow the whale head first. Maybe if need be these two could be fitted and towed?

Written by georgejmyersjr

05/24/2007 at 11:50 am

Canada’s Bluenose

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Posted to Underwater Archaeology forum (sub-arch) reply to “Bluenose info” inquiry. For an interesting description of the national symbol of Canada (on it’s ten cent piece for many years) see this discussion in the archives of sub-arch and this: “Bluenose – In Search of the Truth” in Model Ship Builder

There are some similarities to the Captain Brewster Hawkins designed and built yacht “Wanderer” in Setauket, NY in 1856 or so. It’s reported his son Thomas was it’s captain for about a year before it was sold and used as “the last slaver” (before the US Civil War and boarded by British Navy blockade off of Africa, thought harmless) to the “Bluenose” as I recall the one painting I saw somewhere, in possession of the Port Jefferson Yacht Club in the adjoining harbor, where it was thought once to have been built, actually fitted with water tanks for crossing the Atlantic there. The rear mast would have been copied in the forward mast and the bow flatter with the distinctive triangular sails set repetitively aloft. I was reminded a bit seeing it of the big J yachts raced in the early 20th century shown at the Long Island Maritime Museum near Sayville, NY on the Great South Bay, with their tall masts and steel wire rigging. It went down in a storm off (or on) Maysi, Cuba (old Spanish spelling by Christopher Columbus, the cape just to the north of Guantanamo) after the Civil War, used in the fruit trade. It is commemorated at a plaque and large cast iron pot on Jekyll Island, Georgia, where it discharged its slave cargo, the yacht having been bought by Louisiana cotton merchant’s agent. Then used as a military mail packet, referred to a “chess piece” in the ensuing hostilities. I would think the metal tanks might still be a magnetometer signature in the water.

Written by georgejmyersjr

05/23/2007 at 3:52 am

Posted in Uncategorized

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