Red Ink and Rewrites Too

Duplicates online comments, to keep track.

Archive for July 2007

"OutdoorRugged" Amy Urban’s page

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The photo of Nomad in the office aquarium for a half hour had me laughing (besides “Nomad” on the Star Trek original series that Captain Kirk had to point out its fallible logic to destroy itself and Kirk thereby saves the Universe, well at least the Alpha Quad) and I recalled how our surveyor built a custom case with a heater under it to keep the HX-20 (“world’s first laptop”) warm enough to continue to work in the winter connected by a serial cable to a Leitz Elta-38 in “deep winter” excavations in lower Manhattan off of Whitehall and Broad streets. It finally went on the “fritz” in the high summer humidity of the Hudson Valley in Dobbs Ferry, NY when I guess condensation shorted it out and it started printing gibberish on its little paper built-in dot matrix printer, like those on newer cash registers. No one was near it so it was kind of dramatic. The guy from Zeiss had written the BASIC program for it which I had to change a bit once for a NYC datum, Columbus Circle historically was the 0,0 with all directions from there in positive feet (ENSW) not State Plane or UTM. These new data collectors (I’ve used the Sokkia one when it was Sokkisha, SDR24? after the HX-20) sure are spiffy.

Written by georgejmyersjr

07/31/2007 at 12:25 am

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Safe Surrender: "A First Step To A Second Chance"

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The NY Times once had an editorial citing a study they did which showed back then that the “death penalty” actually increases the fatalities among police officers. This is a great story and one would hope what the current US President meant when he proposed funding in “faith based charities”. I attended grad school in an Anthropology department where a similar program was proposed and observed by June Starr, an anthropologist who did her field-work in changing Turkey, for mediations such as these cited though conducted within the public sphere of law in Suffolk County, New York, that is to point out that it has and could be expanded in the secular sphere also.

Posted by georgejmyers at 05:07 PM : Jul 30, 2007 “Safe Surrender: A First Step To A Second ChanceCouric & Co.

Written by georgejmyersjr

07/30/2007 at 10:53 pm

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Re: Vasa Problems (underwater archaeology "sub-arch" forum)

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Back in the early 1980s a ship was found at the “175 Water Street Site” actually not a single building but a consolidation of previous addresses encompassing a whole old city block in New York City on the edge and resulting building shadow into the South Street Historic District there, a trade-off reported in the press for new zone additional floor(s) for the archaeology, reported in the press after the work. One of the problems with the wood of the “Ronson” ship was that it was supersaturated and its was thought cell wall structure had broken down which leads to structural problems of preservation, which I have no idea how the “apple cheek ” bow was conserved reported to be treated at the Newport News Mariner Museum now also in partnership with South Street.

On another site, the so-called “Assay Site” after the US Federal use of it also near the Seaport District, and its sand blasted chimney stack recovery and “floating vault” on vertical railroad track as rebar, so one could see under it, thwarting would-be tunnels into it was removed a number of thought British cannons and pieces thereof were brought up by the French firm digging the narrow “slurry wall” into the landfill and chiseled into the bedrock, through a mixture of bentonite and water whose specific gravity keeps surrounding water out of the trench and carries the rock and debris out. The pieces were placed in “coffin liners” modified with spigots to recycle the water and remove salts from them. A company provided a stearate based treatment which we applied and re-immersed the cannon pieces which I was told absorbed the stearin or stearate based solvent thereby displacing the water molecules in the what was becoming porous iron structure.

Perhaps something similar might work in wood? Mr. Jed Levin, now with the NPS in Philadelphia, PA, working on the former slave quarters of our first presidents was the person who gave me the can and asked that it be applied. He would have more knowledge of it. The cannons left on a flatbed trailer in their coffin liners for extended treatment in Tallahassee, Florida where they were placed in circulating water tanks I was told. They may have been ballast or dumped before, during or after the American Revolution.

Maybe it was WD-34?

Written by georgejmyersjr

07/30/2007 at 3:31 am

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Recent steel axes introduced…

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Pretty interesting. I had some experience in outdoor survey in archaeology. We used an Epson HX-20 hooked to a Leitz infrared tacheometer back in the mid-1980s and into the 1990s then switched to a Sokkisha which became Sokkia in the co’s I worked for in contract archaeology in the mostly NY/NJ area. GPS was just getting on the ground in 1993. I used close-range photogrammetry from Rollei which creates its own coords to trace 3D info from photos on a digitizing tablet, the maths supplemented with other sources, transit and maybe GPS now? Then the digital cameras started really coming. This year I was looking at the Thales with DGPS which reading here seems to be going off the air. Ironically I was using Annapolis signals instead of Alexandria standing near the airfield at Quantico (WAAS?) where the “Marine One” Sea King will someday soon make its last flight replaced with a EU consortium built helicopter assembled and serviced in New York State thanks to Senator Clinton.

Having access to a large GTCO digitizing tablet allowed various overlays to be traced “onto” (into) and through trial and error attempts at “predictive” locations of historic and prehistoric resources, using the earlier versions of AutoCAD (2.3? to 13) Idrisi, and Corel scans-to-vector from field drawn profiles and sections, allowed interesting map work. For example, in the testing of designed impacts of the remediation of the National Priority Superfund Marathon Battery Site for the EPA in Cold Spring NY within the former operations of the West Point Foundry and later Chicago Steel and Bridge Co. Some of the map work was from a photo of a glass mounted map digitized, and with plotted tree survey and Psion recorded magnetometer survey, allowed the recovery of R. P. Parrott’s gun platform “Swamp Angel” on grillage a gun platform prototype from the filled marsh. It was used in the incendiary bombardment of Charleston, South Carolina in 1863 in the American civil war using the Parrott patented rifled cannon, hidden in the marsh, its location there still not recovered. (1989-1994)

Update: EU and US to Agree Satellite Networks Compatibility

Written by georgejmyersjr

07/28/2007 at 11:43 am

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Beneath the sidewalks of New York City Hall Park

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The walkways in the north side of City Hall Park, closed since 1999, when descriptive excavation of burials by Parsons, Inc. and thought associated with the “First Almshouse” were found relatively near the surface of planned upgrades to the park (retractable stone bollards, similarly as seen on British TV recently destroying a would be truck bomb) will open next week. The statue of Horace Greeley, a monument to Joseph Pulitzer and an American Engineering monument to what was arguably the city’s first art museum building, a circular painted scenic vista, I think later owned by PT Barnum of Bridgeport, Connecticut before he moved to larger quarters, once between former British Army barracks, the old city gaol and now currently the Tweed Courthouse and City Hall, will all be on view again. City Hall was designed by the architect of the President George Washington commissioned lighthouse at Montauk Point, John McComb, Jr. and with others also designed the dam so named in NYC the park which it became, today in part the site of the new Yankee Stadium under construction.

A Lower Manhattan Shortcut to Reopen After Seven Years

Northern End of City Hall Park to Reopen

Views of City Hall, “the oldest still in use as one in America” (contested statement, once under mock siege by Bostonians who due to a computer glitch were issued thousands of traffic tickets, for example see “Mr. Bloomberg, Perth Amboy Begs to Differ” )

Written by georgejmyersjr

07/27/2007 at 4:12 pm

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Happy Birthday Mick Jagger! Thanks for the Rock and Roll Circus! (TV is better than never)

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Pan Macmillan announces publication this autumn of the autobiography of one of rock ‘n’ roll’s finest and best-loved –

Ronnie
by
Ronnie Wood

to be published 12th October 2007 at £20.00

Written by georgejmyersjr

07/26/2007 at 5:46 pm

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Re: Twentieth Century Fishing Communities (histarch)

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You might want to read, “Two Islands: Grand Manan And Sanibel” by Katherine Scherman (1971), one island in the Bay of Fundy (actually an archipelago) with various fishing histories some still working, the other island, off Florida in the US, the first National Wildlife Refuge in the US, though its not an ethnographic study per se but written by a resident of both. Some of my family is from Grand Manan and I had my first cash in hand picking and drying dulse, a red deep depth seaweed, there on Indian Beach in 1967 after a 29 days of fog and rain. Highest tides in the world nearby.

There’s a few ethnographies that I recall some from Newfoundland and another from the French “tiny overseas islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon” that may be of interest (dried codfish). Some of the Caribbean ethnographies are interesting such as “Crab Antics: A Caribbean Study of the Conflict Between Reputation and Respectability” in the social anthropology genre.

If you know anyone looking for a fairly new canning factory, there’s one in Seal Cove Grand Manan for sale I think belongs to Bumblebee who bought the Connors Brothers (Blacks Harbour, NB) then Brunswick brands. Seal Cove smokehouses there, where they smoke and dry herring in wood sheds, I think have been a part of the “triangle” of trade for many years with the Caribbean, originally settled by “downeasters” from Maine which wasn’t a state in the Union until 1820. They say you can hear it still in their voices, unlike “God’s Country” up-the-island in North Head and Castalia where the “homestead” was and a few still buried.

Written by georgejmyersjr

07/25/2007 at 2:43 am

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