Red Ink and Rewrites Too

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Archive for June 2010

On photography…

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Far from the maddening crowd. I walked away thinking in "Lipstick" they had actually shot part of the film with one of those motor-driven fashion cameras, put directly in the film, it gave a sense of the pressure. Those flashes at events are horrid. The changes in photography have been amazing, though. I once measured 3D info from flat photos in close-range photogrammetry developed by Rollei, brought aerial photos to Earth, from a series of purposefully "oblique" photos then measured on a digitizing "tablet". Canada wanted something for our air-crashes in Gander, Newfoundland (Brits use for car ones). The laser imaging chip was invented at Los Alamos, NM, which has revolutionized “as-built” recording and other uses, CGI in cinematography, architecture, modeling, etc.  I have a new small camera and have gotten used to not holding it up to my eye!

See for example:  Laser light, GPS, Subaru used for precise glacier measurementFairbanks Daily News-Miner one month ago.

Written by georgejmyersjr

06/28/2010 at 12:00 am

One of the last Liberty ships…

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I recall working on a “predictive model” of archaeology resources on the Passaic River in New Jersey back in the early 1980s. Near the mouth of the river was a large scrap yard. We happened on one gentleman who showed us onto the property with proper ID from the US Army Corps of Engineers. He mentioned that the ship at dockside, was one of the last Liberty ships, over 2000 constructed in World War II, (“The 250,000 parts were pre-fabricated throughout the country in 250-ton sections…”)  and it was being scrapped. I consulted Wikipedia and narrowed down the search to these three, the only reported among the last scrapped Liberty ships:

  • SS Henry L. Pittock  24 June 1943 Russia 1943 as Askold, later Dalryba, scrapped 1982

Named for the famous 19th century American newspaper publisher in Portland, Oregon.

  • SS Samlamu 14 June 1944 Sold private 1947, scrapped 1982

“Loan Great Britain” Later traveled in the South Pacific, i.e., New Zealand, etc.  “ex- Samlamu, 1947 purchased from MOWT renamed Kingsbury, 1960 sold to Poland renamed Huta Bedzin.”

  • SS Thomas Nelson 4 April 1942 Kamikazied off Leyte 1944, repaired, converted to diesel 1956, scrapped 1981

Army Transportation Service. Named for the famous American patriot who replaced Thomas Jefferson as Governor of Virginia.

So I think, from the date when I visited the scrap yard in New Jersey and this info, it appears that one of the last Liberty ships scrapped, and in New Jersey, may have been used by the Russians at first in war and then for fishing before scrapped, the SS Henry L. Pittock, as the Russian Dalryba or perhaps was scrapped by Poland as the Huta Bedzin (“Bedzin Ironworks”). Many ships and boats (PT boats JFK served on) were built in New Jersey some reportedly lengthened like the “P2” my grandfather Lawrence G. Urquhart served on, the USS Admiral E. W. Eberle  which was renamed U.S. Army Transport General Simon B. Buckner and then USNS General Simon B. Buckner. One of the few, perhaps, US Navy ships, named after an Army general. My grandfather used to joke they built so many ships, they ran out of admirals and had to start naming them after generals! I’m inclined to think it was the Huta Bedzin as it seems to stir some part of the little grey cells as Hercule Poirot used to say.

Interestingly, the Liberty ship SS George B. Cortelyou, the only ship in US history to ever been named “Cetus” (after the whale constellation, and when renamed) was as, the keel was laid down, named after the native New Yorker, who held three Cabinet posts under Presidents McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt, VP when President McKinley died from an assassin’s bullet, eight days after an attempt on his life in Buffalo, New York at the Pan-American Exposition, also attended by Mr. Cortelyou. He is sometimes credited as our “first White House Press Secretary” (US National Archives journal article) inviting the press in to inform them about the wounded President McKinley, then expected to recover. He started as a short-hand teacher in NYC and later was Chairman of the Republican Party and after serving as Postmaster General, lived at “Harbor Lights” in Huntington, NY, recently up for sale. The first known New York historically recorded, “Cortelyou” was a Jacques Cortelyou hired by the Dutch to survey Brooklyn, NY and a “downtown” street there bears that surname. So, the only official US ship ever named after “whales” once also had a French-American name.

Written by georgejmyersjr

06/23/2010 at 5:14 pm

Dangerous Minds | Tropic of Cancer: the movie (and the summer solstice in Northern hemisphere)

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Jun 11, 2010 George Stephen Myers says:

Thank you for the link to “Ulysses”. To think I had to “go to China” to see it seems outrageous or at the very least, extreme. Here, we have Mayor Bloomburg, hardly Leopold. I’ve seen a few live productions at the university level (Stony Brook, where Nobel laureate C.N. Yang taught) of “Ulysses in Night Town” and attempted to read the story a number of times and I thought the film wonderfully close to the authors intent, a masterful use of cinema to tell a story, one hard to understand in print, though in retrospect, once kept out of the USA by “legal” prejudice.

Jun 11, 2010 George S. Myers says:

I also noticed the so-called “Vulcan salute” from TV’s “Star Trek” (1966) used by the “alien” Mr. Spock, played by Leonard Nimoy, is shown also used by “Leopold Bloom” played by Milo O’Shea in “Ulysses” (1967) directed by recently deceased Joseph Strick. It’s in a “dream sequence” where he’s mayor of Dublin, Ireland or somewhere near that in the film. Mr. Nimoy states it is from the Jewish worship he attended.

Dangerous Minds | Tropic of Cancer: the movie

Written by georgejmyersjr

06/23/2010 at 3:21 am

Faisal Shahzad, Times Square Car Bomb Suspect, Pleads Guilty To ‘Mass Destruction’ Charge

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Could this guy be considered delusional? To my knowledge, from a few years of listening to this topic reported by the press and tested by the US Army, depicted in a photo in Newsday on Long Island, (once also published in the Bronx, gone after a headline of “44 Blocks of Boos” reporting on then Mayor Giuliani’s attendance in the yearly Puerto Rican Day parade) that so-called fertilizer bombs have to be immersed in oil and nothing less than very unstable mercury fulminate used to make it “exothermic” otherwise one big “ridiculous” if that’s allowed, attempt at terrorism. Will there be any consideration whether this had potentially any “real” probability of working? Not that I support said acts of terror in any form, this one perhaps a different “orchestration” by Muslim devotees.

Faisal Shahzad, Times Square Car Bomb Suspect, Pleads Guilty To ‘Mass Destruction’ Charge#comment_51224413

Further: It was reported to have been parked outside the headquarters of Comedy Central, Inc. where the controversial stop motion cartoon, “South Park” had been admonished for its mis-use of the Prophet Mohammad in its “comedy” of mostly children and some adults. Or is it?

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06/22/2010 at 4:20 pm

Posted in Law, New York City

Surveying Wildlife in Alaska – Readers’ Comments – NYTimes.com

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I read that the drilling there is non-destructive because the rigs “walk” on the tundra (NY Times mag.) We’ve been going through a tundra warming in Alaska, and glaciers have also melted further south. I worked in the Federal archeology of Skagway, AK, the gold-rush town about 90 miles from Juneau, without a road from there to it. It is an international port, and has a railroad, and now vehicle road into the Canadian Yukon and British Columbia. I wonder, seeing some mineral resources go overseas to Asia, pre-processed molybdenum for steel production rail-shipped out of B.C., then freighter from Skagway (“home of the north wind”) if we might explore obtaining resources a little closer to home rather than mukluking in the melting tundra, as some have predicted. After all Canada is a very large country. Who’d have thought diamonds would be mined there? Surveying Wildlife in Alaska – Readers’ Comments – NYTimes.com Bronx, NY June 21st, 2010 12:33 pm

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06/21/2010 at 4:56 pm

msnbc.com technology & science – Experts to tunnel for Aztec rulers’ tombs

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I would hope it might further explain the trade in turquoise and peyote in the American Southwest where ancient turquoise mines are found. I was told there is a room outside Pueblo Bonita that had over a million pieces in it and two “Meso-American” style burials under it. A professor had a National Science Foundation grant at Stony Brook University for the Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island in New York years ago for “neutron activation trace element analysis in statistical hyperspace” which would allow “signatures” of turquoise retrieved in clinal sampling, at great risk it appeared to me then by a university in Illinois, thin columns holding up ceilings, and the origin or “fake” artifacts found attributed to Aztecan art determined to be “real” or not. The method also can be used to determine the “signature” of modern materials and purity of constituents for materials research, so a large national center has been opened by a consortium of universities, which should lead to better materials, i.e., longer lasting and stronger, etc. Hyperspace was like stacking spreadsheets, invented since and finding patterns for the trace elements amounts, through the levels of data, or spreadsheets. Most desktop programs now can do that. msnbc.com technology & science – Experts to tunnel for Aztec rulers’ tombs#comments

Written by georgejmyersjr

06/20/2010 at 1:08 am

On receiving an invitation to the NRA…

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One step forward two steps back they used to say about the USSR. Now we too step back and execute people with rifles, in my opinion two steps back. 17,000 Latvian Rifles brought the Russian Revolution, and I think the Latvians also ended it, though the fodder shortage and the breakdown of “state-barter” systems had a lot to do with it. I recall 1963, JFK shot and killed and being shown pictures of the first woman given the electric chair in Cook County, Illinois, a newsman’s smuggled photo and large gatherings of people for hanging in the desert West. I was in the last public hanging location in New York state Mayville, NY near Lake Chautauqua, a couple of times, this time when our governor was suggesting the death penalty for a Mr. Williams, accused of purposefully infecting underage white girls with the HIV virus. Times have changed, only one news truck with a satellite link outside the county-seat courthouse. Is this what the Supreme Court decided to bring back? Two steps?

Written by georgejmyersjr

06/19/2010 at 10:07 pm

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