Red Ink and Rewrites Too

Duplicates online comments, to keep track.

Archive for August 2010

West Point Military Academy Published Twain’s “1601”

leave a comment »

I was just checking my Spacejock software “yRead3” from Australia, which hooks up to Project Gutenberg, providing free world famous books and texts read by “Microsoft Anna” if you have Windows 7 (or others in earlier Windows OS) and having read the Wikipedia entry on Chaucer, “the Miller told his tale” not the mirror, and other forms of satire, came across this “[Date: 1601.] Conversation, as it was the Social Fireside, in the Time of the Tudors“ or just 1601” (1601 (Mark Twain)Wikipedia) and thought to hear and read it in yRead3. Not available in the yRead3 catalogue generated, the Wikipedia entry supplies a hyperlink to it, and I downloaded it in plain text and loaded it into yRead3. Well, I was quite surprised given the history of censorship cited in the Wikipedia reference, to find that it was first printed by a Lieutenant Wood at the West Point Military Academy and distributed to many kings and queens and became quite popular. The introduction to “1601” is very interesting, provided by Project Gutenberg here in different formats.

Written by georgejmyersjr

08/31/2010 at 5:20 pm

What Would Our Founding Fathers Say About the ‘Ground Zero Mosque’?

leave a comment »


This is particularly, I insist, about New York not the United States. In the beginning there were as many as 30 languages heard in cosmopolitan New Amsterdam. A law under Governor Peter Stuyvesant, former Governor of Dutch Curacao, the first Jewish community immigrated here from northern Brazil, stated that all recognized religions would meet in a structure so constructed. Ironically a Reverend Doughty, from the burned village of Maspeth in now the borough of Queens, had so many attendees at his services behind the Wall and the protection of the fort, that the Dutch administrators decided they too would need a church of Dutch language or lose its people to the English preacher. The Quakers were a thorn in the Dutch side, would not doff their hats to authority and laid prostrate in protest of it, often had their early “meetings” out of doors and when retreating from rainfall to a barn, mistakenly arrested the husband of preacher, a woman, and sent him off to prison for over a year over the “structure” law. It resulted in the so-called “Queens Remonstrance” a very important document in the history of New York, which demanded and sought approval for the “freedom” of religious practice, not dictated by fancy architects perhaps in their own personal salvation of some sort. I find it odd that it appears more of the story appears brought back now in time.

Some historians (Woodward) think the first “president” of the US was a John Scott, who led a group of 200 Long Islanders to New Amsterdam to present a petition for their religious freedom under the new Prince of Orange. Stuyvesant tore the petition up in public without reading it.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

Written by georgejmyersjr

08/24/2010 at 3:43 pm

The World of New York Politics: Paterson, Giuliani, and the matter of the NY Yankee Tickets

leave a comment »

The World of New York Politics: Paterson, Giuliani, and the matter of the NY Yankee Tickets: “As you may know, and I’m not sure if it changed under Mr. Giuliani, then Mayor Koch was ‘ordered’ to show his daily agenda as part of good government by the City Council, so there would be some fair-warning where the Mayor would show up, I imagine for the press. What I found very astounding, and I’d seen former Mayor Giuliani a few times in City Hall Park, in the archaeology of the ‘First Almshouse’ cemetery in 1999 a part of City Hall upgrades and improvements, was that he could just deny access to city records to the State Comptroller, then Mr. McCall, claiming an audit part of ‘politics’ said to be running for NY Governor! I’m not sure any other mayor in the U.S. could get away with that. He also, then visiting Arkansas, considering a possible U.S. Senate campaign against now Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, had its state flag flown over City Hall! City Council legislation followed up on it so that something like it, ordering a city employee to obtain one and do so, would never happen again. I think they should let up on Governor Paterson, and ask who was injured by it.”

Written by georgejmyersjr

08/23/2010 at 11:24 am

Grand Manan: Jewel of the Sea — Excerpt

leave a comment »

Grand Manan: Jewel of the Sea — Excerpt: “More Than A Doctor

‘Dr. John Faxon was the first medical doctor on Grand Manan, arriving in 1808 from the United States. He settled at Seal Cove and one of his favorite hobbies was walking, which he enjoyed when visiting the sick or just as his own personal exercise.

This physician seemed to have an enterprising spirit and was somewhat of an engineer. Noticing the natural land sea wall that separated Seal Cove from the Bay of Fundy waters, he set about finding able bodied workers to cut a passage through this barrier to the sea.

Because of the organized efforts of Dr. Faxon, Seal Cove fishermen now enjoy a beautiful high water harbour.

Dr. Faxon was accompanied by an interesting character by the name of John Tar. Mr. Tar claimed he had sailed under the command of Captain John Paul Jones, the famous American sea fighter. The swarthy sailor continuously went on wild sprees and enjoyed singing of his previous adventures.

One stormy night, Dr. Faxon could no longer stand the conduct or language of John Tar, so he put him out of his home. As he attempted to make his way to a neighbour’s, John Tar fell over a cliff and was killed. The place where the old sailor met his violent death is still called Tar’s Cove.

Dr. Faxon continued his enterprising ways and by 1811 had launched the first full rigged ship built on Grand Manan. When the war of 1812 broke out, Dr. Faxon very hastily returned to the United States and his property went to local residents.

The impact of the island’s first doctor is still enjoyed today by local fishermen, photographers and artists when high tides enter Seal Cove.'”

My family used to have the large old house next to the Provincial schoolhouse in Seal Cove. It was coming off its foundation, a large round presumably salty beach cobble in the thin concrete wall led to it cracking, and we were told the former 12 room house of plaster and lath, was twisting in the winter winds on the hill, out as it were, in the open. Finally the decision was to paint or not to paint, we are the Province, and we had it taken down. It might have had some historical importance and later monies might have aided another attempt at repair. Someone said they played basketball in it! They say you can still hear a “down east” Yankee accent in Seal Cove.

Written by georgejmyersjr

08/22/2010 at 9:43 pm

Interesting Space Shuttle launch photo.

leave a comment »

XXX
Thanks whoever took this and put it on the Internet.

Written by georgejmyersjr

08/20/2010 at 5:32 pm

Governors Island: A Special Space – ArtsBeat Blog – NYTimes.com

leave a comment »

There is/was quite a number of well-known people in the arts, and others, who think that Fort Williams would make an excellent theater-in-the-round for Shakespeare productions. They proposed an adaptive reuse of the structure, that I was told once held Walt Disney, AWOL after missing the steam ferry on its appointed schedule, I was told by a Coast Guard groundskeeper, there after emptying, I there assisting a geoarchaeology testing, part of it being turned over for the $1 former President Clinton offered New Yorkers for its continued good use. Did you know it’s where President Reagan last met Premier Gorbachev? What a setting for Shakespeare drama!

Governors Island: A Special Space – ArtsBeat Blog – NYTimes.com

Written by georgejmyersjr

08/15/2010 at 5:07 pm

Lesbian Cadet Quits West Point, Cites ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’

leave a comment »

A “forgotten” part of the Academy, across the Hudson River, to the east, is Constitution Island, just south of Cold Spring, NY the site of the famous West Point Foundry, where cannons were made for the U.S. The school didn’t open until 1802, but there were fortifications on Constitution Island, designed by the Cartographer of the American Revolutionary Army, Dutch patriot, Bernard Romans, and included a “Great Chain” forged there stretched across the Hudson River to West Point to impede the British Navy from a “divide and conquer” strategy from NYC to Canada, dividing the north and south colonies. It’s reported to have been the ancestral home of the Tappan “Indians”. Later the patented R.P. Parrott rifled cannon, forged there, is said to have dramatically won the Civil War, both mobile and very large sizes, such as the “Swamp Angel” which bombarded Charleston, SC in 1863. I ask the US, having worked on both sides of the river in archaeology, is this DADT in your Constitution, so bravely fought for, if so where? Show me where. I’ll show you where it never was a policy.
Huffington Post: Lesbian Cadet Quits West Point, Cites ‘Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell’

%d bloggers like this: