Red Ink and Rewrites Too

Duplicates online comments, to keep track.

Archive for January 2012

Let Eleanor Speak for Herself — Fix the FDR Memorial

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Maybe someone would put the acrimoniou­s quote here in the comments? I recall finding out about Eleanor Roosevelt stopping in the "Old Tea Room" in Coram, NY on Long Island across the road from a grassy airfield, she once flew with one of the Tuskegee pilots for over 45 minutes causing some consternat­ion in the press. Old "Tea Rooms" were places people could go if they were in dire straights and find some comfort and perhaps a solution to some problems. This one was next to a small brick (clay from across the road) courthouse­/post office and one of Eleanor’s stops on Long Island. From the 18th century it has since burned down. My brother and friends rented it for awhile. Another colleague inventorie­d the various artifacts she received traveling in Central and South America.
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

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Written by georgejmyersjr

01/23/2012 at 5:58 pm

Sherman’s Southern Sympathies – Comment – NY Times

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Abraham Lincoln, though he fought in the Blackhawk War is considered by many historians to be no great military general and had relied on the inexperienced. One thing I read was that Sherman changed the nature of "war" i.e., against property rather than people. One property he did not (perhaps) find, was the large powder mill about 30 miles outside Atlanta, erected from London, England Crystal Palace brochures, by a Hudson River foundry owner, perhaps tired of the contracts that all went to the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, New York across the river from the US Military Academy. It’s where the patented R.P. Parrott rifled cannons were cast (6-pdr to 300-pdr) and figured significantly in range and destruction in the civil war. West Point Foundry is also cited as the first site of a "labor action" in a Federal facility, perhaps "federalized" once the war was declared said to have been run with clandestine iron-workers from Great Britain. It’s currently been archaeologically investigated, in part over NIKE missile battery contaminants, i.e., nickel, cadmium, in Foundry Cove next to Constitution Island.

Civil War | The New York Times
http://www.facebook.com/nytimescivilwar

Written by georgejmyersjr

01/20/2012 at 12:14 am

Glock Book Chronicles A History Of America’s Gun (PHOTOS)

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America’s gun might be considered the Beretta pistol, as it’s manufactur­ed in Washington­, D.C. The Society for Industrial Archaeolog­y toured its manufactur­ing plant as part of a yearly meeting. It, the Beretta, I thought a good choice for the NYPD the largest in the land, though perhaps "now" rather than "then" when the Glock was selected. The Beretta has interchang­eable calibers, i.e. different size bullets for different situations that might result in less "innocent bystander" injuries and deaths. If a .32 caliber or even .22 used in a subway there would be less chance of ricochet injury and/or penetratio­n and into the innocent or "bullet proof vest" injuries. The other calibers are also available. A sidearm with different interchang­eable barrels is what the modern Glock could/shou­ld also be working on, not plastic weapons undetectab­le to "remote sensing".
Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

Written by georgejmyersjr

01/12/2012 at 1:03 am

“Live Free, or Die”

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New Hampshire State Legislators: Don’t Repeal the Freedom to Marry

Why I signed: I’ve vacationed a number of years with my friend on Tuftonboro Neck, NH outside historic Wolfeboro. I feel this is a sneaky trick that should stop. Peter Livius, one of the first Supreme Court justices of Canada (and who sued royal Governor Wentworth, the only "governor" survivor of the American Revolution, after, of Nova Scotia) once owned Tuftonboro Neck.

Written by georgejmyersjr

01/08/2012 at 11:09 pm

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