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Archive for the ‘American History’ Category

The strange case of the missing NYC landmark…

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In ArchaeoSeek
The strange case of the missing NYC landmark…
Posted by George J. Myers, Jr. on March 19, 2009 at 10:00am
At io9 there is an interesting posting: “Digging Deep: 24 Science Fiction Archaeologists”
I commented:
“The excavation on the Moon in Kubrick’s and Clarke’s “2001 A Space Odyssey” was archaeological I thought, though I don’t recall who was in charge. From the original short story and idea I think “The Sentinel” by Arthur C. Clarke. Conforms to the idea of archaeology unleashing some unknown force as stated here, like in “The Exorcist” by excavating something unknown, like a “devil pipe” on a site I worked on that had a ship buried in it in lower Manhattan years ago.”

I stated at Facebook when asked for the name of the ship buried in Manhattan referred to above in one of the last parking lots, the “Ronson” ship. We found it, I and an African American and a backhoe operator, West Point MP during WWII in the last test of three permitted, they were intent on excavating in the backyards there the archaeologists. They represented a British consortium that became National Westminster Bank. It was a “trailer truck” of the 18th century thought built before 1740 about 80′ by 25′, which we know little about, the warships however much ado about everything. They gave us from Dec to March to empty it out and document parts of it and the bow was taken out and conserved at Newport News Mariners Museum, VA the “apple-cheek” type it was called. Ship worms (teredo) of the N. Atlantic and Caribbean in it IDed by a biologist. Some frags of a woman’s jaw too were found I was told but not publicly described. It was a hulk used to create landfill along the former shore.”
And:
“One of the archaeologists thought it was the derelict stated in the city council meeting minutes as a nuisance though a location was not given. Very early in New Amsterdam there’s also cited an “old shipwreck” nearby Philippe du Trieux whose property became the Isaac Allerton Warehouse, outside the Wall for the English doing business there. Isaac Allerton is reburied in New Haven in the cemetery Yale University maintains. He’s also named in Allerton Ave. in the Bronx a large street, the exit between the Bronx Zoo and the Botanical Gardens on the oldest motor parkway in the US the Bronx River Parkway. He kept a home in New Haven had business in Maine and “abandoned” the Pilgrims, he a Puritan, apparently a partial construction’s archaeology discovered discussed “In Small Things Forgotten” by J. Deetz. Once upon a time a monument erected by the Mayflower Society was up in the Seaport, across the street from where Alfred E. Smith grew up, first Catholic to run for President, I reported.”

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On “A genetic history of leprosy”

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Is there anything therefore to the fact that the North American armadillo can be the only known other carrier of leprosy (Hansen’s disease)? There was recent early evidence thought in an early tomb in Israel from 2000 years ago. It’s thought as many as 40 million armadillos were around back then. Could it be the original trans-species disease?  Scientific American: The Scicurious Brain

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06/14/2013 at 2:47 pm

All Hands on Deck for the SS United States

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All Hands on Deck for the SS United States

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06/07/2013 at 11:32 pm

New Hampshire Emancipates 18th-Century Slaves

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New Hampshire Emancipates 18th-Century Slaves. A part of Portsmouth’s new African Burial Ground ceremony.

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06/07/2013 at 3:03 pm

The Great Civil War Lie

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NY Times: Disunion: One of the North’s worries was the ability of Great Britain to build large dangerous ships. One, in particular, the Scorpion class, with more modern cannon turrets vs. the deck mounted rails for large ordnance, was stopped, though two were built and later used by the British Navy as shown in Wikipedia. One built and completed, the CSS Alabama, created havoc in the Atlantic until finally sunk by the USS Kearsarge, off the coast of Cherbourg, France, where some of the Confederates are buried. The Union compelled the designer/owner of what became known as the submarine "Alligator" to be used and ordered up the James River to Appomattox, though then lower water levels wouldn’t allow it to submerge, perhaps a possible fleet of them served as a warning to other nations. Reparations in Switzerland amounted to over $20 million, fined for the construction of the CSS Alabama I’ve read after the Civil War. The "Alligator" also sunk off of Cape Hatteras, NC, as did the USS Monitor, and is being searched for as part of the inventory of the more recent "Battle of the Atlantic".

George Takei “Heroes come in many forms…”

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As Norman Yoshio Mineta, the former Democrat Cabinet member under both George W. Bush and William J. Clinton explained, it was, I think he meant, as if Japanese-Americans were then not allowed to own property in California, unless there really was a law like that. Some have suggested Anglo farmers wanted Mexicans and Mexican-Americans to work on their farms, not Japanese-Americans and FDR conceded, an "over-the-barrel" bind of strategic resources in time of war. The few people I’ve met associated with the internments were often pro-American democracy, Morris Opler, PhD, anthropologist, helped write three of the four suits brought before the US Supreme Court on behalf of internees, i.e., Americans have rights as did his study people, the Apache, misunderstood. His brother Marvin Opler, PhD was also a noted anthropologist I once had the time to study with in Buffalo, NY. My father in WWII in Italy had quite a respect for the so-called "nisei" (second generation) who fought bravely there, earning more decorations than any other unit, and elsewhere, at great loss in some circumstances, i.e. Battle of the Bulge, rescuing US Army Texans.

NY Times “Bob Fletcher Dies at 101; Saved Farms of Interned Japanese-Americans”

George Takei on Facebook

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06/07/2013 at 1:40 pm

Captain Kirk to Major Tom

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Nice interview. I worked in HAZMAT in the early 1990s and was shown that when people wore the then highest protection, Level A, there was no way to communicate by radio, and one relied on gestures. A company came up with a radio which they stated could communicate with the ISS from a helicopter, for use in HAZMAT. Of course I wonder if that actually happened, but I could sleep a little better, having been in HAZMAT suit in 90+ weather on a tennis court at the old Bellevue Nursing School and the Elmsford Fire Center a number of times. All in the name of Federal archeology.

William Shatner’s post

Written by georgejmyersjr

02/13/2013 at 9:08 am

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