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Archive for the ‘Anthropology’ Category

Apparently HIV has an over 100 year trail…

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http://nyp.st/1FcHlDT

Written by georgejmyersjr

02/26/2015 at 4:15 am

Posted in Anthropology, forensics

George Takei “Heroes come in many forms…”

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As Norman Yoshio Mineta, the former Democrat Cabinet member under both George W. Bush and William J. Clinton explained, it was, I think he meant, as if Japanese-Americans were then not allowed to own property in California, unless there really was a law like that. Some have suggested Anglo farmers wanted Mexicans and Mexican-Americans to work on their farms, not Japanese-Americans and FDR conceded, an "over-the-barrel" bind of strategic resources in time of war. The few people I’ve met associated with the internments were often pro-American democracy, Morris Opler, PhD, anthropologist, helped write three of the four suits brought before the US Supreme Court on behalf of internees, i.e., Americans have rights as did his study people, the Apache, misunderstood. His brother Marvin Opler, PhD was also a noted anthropologist I once had the time to study with in Buffalo, NY. My father in WWII in Italy had quite a respect for the so-called "nisei" (second generation) who fought bravely there, earning more decorations than any other unit, and elsewhere, at great loss in some circumstances, i.e. Battle of the Bulge, rescuing US Army Texans.

NY Times “Bob Fletcher Dies at 101; Saved Farms of Interned Japanese-Americans”

George Takei on Facebook

Written by georgejmyersjr

06/07/2013 at 1:40 pm

Soapy Smith

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Histarch Subject: New Book by Cathy Spude

The University of Oklahoma Press has just published my new book, “That Fiend in Hell”: Soapy Smith in Legend. Soapy Smith’s story is well-known to people who like popular culture, and those who are familiar with Alaskan history. As an anthropologist, I show how his legend grew out of the myth of the American West to make him a character the likes of Jesse James, Billy the Kid, and Wyatt Earp. That Fiend in Hell is an expose of how historic events are interpreted even at the time of their occurance within the social mileau of a culture’s understanding of their own value system. See http://www.oupress.com/ECommerce/Book/Detail/1686/that%20fiend%20in%20hell  for more information, or go to Amazon.com.
Catherine H. Spude, PhD

Congratulations! What a lot of work that must have been. I thought I heard of Soapy Smith perhaps in the stories of Colorado, of which “Myers Avenue: A Quick History of Cripple Creek’s Red Light District” by c) 1967 by Leland Feitz Library of Congress Catalog Card No 68-405 is one he might have been part of before leaving for Skagway, Alaska.

I enjoyed that summer 1980 out West through the ash of Mt. St. Helens on a Greyhound, a jet and then a small plane from Juneau to Skagway to work on Alaska’s first RR station and the Captain Moore Cabin. The airport there is better as seen in the recent Microsoft “Flight” a virtual Skagway geography along with the rest of Alaska and Hawaii.

I found this on Amazon and sent it to my Kindle, a scanned article from “Cassier’s Magazine” titled “Across the Chilkoot Pass by wire cable” from the Dyea tide and river side, found on microform in the Provincial Archives of British Columbia circa 1981 c) Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions. The funicular, “powered by rope or cable” was planned to go from Sheep Camp to Crater Lake, in contract, then “since” extended to a point known as Canyon Camp connecting with a surface road “running through the Dyea Canyon, and along the Dyea river, to the head of the tidewater thus making an uninterrupted transportation between Dyea and Crater Lake” “Later on” its author states “the cable system will, undoubtedly, be extended to Lake Linderman, the head of lake navigation”. (William Hewitt b. 1853 http://archive.org/details/cihm_15214)

It has many diagrams and pictures of its construction and how it developed. It shows a similar funicular system was used in New York state on “a wire rope tramway used by the Solvay Process Company at Syracuse, N.Y shows both wooden and iron supports”. I had the opportunity to ponder the Solvay location before they took the plant down. Interestingly the Solvay process of soda ash is named after a French sociologist! It’s reported a large amount of dynamite used in WWI was made there in the Split Rock quarries, and if the chemical fire, which ran out of water to control it, had jumped the creek, it would have leveled Syracuse with the disputed force of a small “atomic bomb” if the dynamite stored in small wooden barrels had caught fire. Albert Einstein disputed that in a letter, a researcher of the Solvay Plant had. The line had been “used for carrying lime rock from the Split Rock quarries to the soda ash works, at Geddes.” There are some problems with the scan however in getting some of the distances and numbers.

Geopolitical arguments are better than conflicts

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Geopolitical arguments are better than conflicts. I work in archaeology and have seen base expansion, Fort Drum, NY to 7000 US Army 10th Mountain and support, formally from Camp Hale, CO, and have seen others “close” for example the US Navy leave and the US Air Guard is still there, what was in WWII, Warminster, now parkland, and Willow Grove Naval Air Station, now Horsham Air Guard. Next door a great aviation museum. It’s where autogyros and the first US Mail planes were built and many others. In terms of public safety, a good idea, according to my Snapple cap, 40% of the US population lives a 1 hour drive from Philadelphia, PA and those other areas, with jets, as close. When I think of the contrast of 1983 Army and today’s, I would gladly see more “forensic accounting” than forensics as our forces have modernized. That I think is what former US President, Columbia University president, and former US General Eisenhower meant of the then newly formed “military-industrial complex”. Future military base-closures inevitable Panetta warns

Written by georgejmyersjr

08/09/2012 at 9:01 am

Mass grave in London reveals how volcano caused global catastrophe

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Scientists search for the explosive source of a disaster that wiped out almost a third of Londoners in 1258

theguardian | The Observer

A more recent one caused the “18 hundred and froze to death” 1816 in the northeast US and I’ve read Northern Europe. “Mechanics” those then employed in shipbuilding in Setauket, NY (about 100?) had to wear their winter coats in July. Crops didn’t grow in “the year without summer” from the atmospheric dust from the volcano explosion in Indonesia, then too. I think “middlemen” ports like Baltimore, MD profited by shipping needed comestibles north. Not sure if however, there was such a large effect on the population as this dramatic archaeology research shows. US populations were quite lower. On Long Island, where it’s reported 10,000 cords of wood were cut for the War 1812, it might have had effect, a primary source of heat then, coal wouldn’t show up until 1840 or so, though early expeditions were organized as far back as the days of Oliver Cromwell in Huntington, NY to look for coal to fire brick.

Mass grave in London reveals how volcano caused global catastrophe

Written by georgejmyersjr

08/05/2012 at 9:10 am

Oldest Maya mural wows archaeologists

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Oldest Maya mural wows archaeologists.

Written by georgejmyersjr

06/20/2012 at 9:50 am

On Forming a Digital Anthropology Group–Neuroanthropology

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George J. Myers, Jr. says:

February 24, 2012 at 5:15 am

I worked in some of the early digital uses for archaeology in particular when Intel 387 chips allowed complex trigonometric processing in hardware. While at Grossman and Associates in NYC we had the use of the then developing Rolleimetric 3D photo recording system allowing aerial photogrammetry “brought to earth” so to speak for many types of investigations, ours, the “least contact” recording of a HAZMAT Superfund site in Cold Spring, NY. Measured and drawn from a digitizing tablet the 3D digital information was traced from field photos, using a documented camera, lens and reseau. Other uses were where wall-mounted maps could be recorded for further digital overlays, i.e., aerial photos, digital maps, digitized historic maps, etc. Other uses have been reported for petroglyph recording, sculpture design, i.e. “Crazy Horse” monument, “as-builts” for historic preservation plans, underwater shipwrecks, etc. The quick exposure and treatment of human remains might be also so documented for further research with these digital tools. Not sure if this fits the AAA idea however.

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