Red Ink and Rewrites Too

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Archive for the ‘Canada’ Category

George Takei “Heroes come in many forms…”

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As Norman Yoshio Mineta, the former Democrat Cabinet member under both George W. Bush and William J. Clinton explained, it was, I think he meant, as if Japanese-Americans were then not allowed to own property in California, unless there really was a law like that. Some have suggested Anglo farmers wanted Mexicans and Mexican-Americans to work on their farms, not Japanese-Americans and FDR conceded, an "over-the-barrel" bind of strategic resources in time of war. The few people I’ve met associated with the internments were often pro-American democracy, Morris Opler, PhD, anthropologist, helped write three of the four suits brought before the US Supreme Court on behalf of internees, i.e., Americans have rights as did his study people, the Apache, misunderstood. His brother Marvin Opler, PhD was also a noted anthropologist I once had the time to study with in Buffalo, NY. My father in WWII in Italy had quite a respect for the so-called "nisei" (second generation) who fought bravely there, earning more decorations than any other unit, and elsewhere, at great loss in some circumstances, i.e. Battle of the Bulge, rescuing US Army Texans.

NY Times “Bob Fletcher Dies at 101; Saved Farms of Interned Japanese-Americans”

George Takei on Facebook

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Written by georgejmyersjr

06/07/2013 at 1:40 pm

Tesla’s Tower, Wardenclyffe

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I was pleased to hear the Tesla workshop at Wardenclyffe, near the shut Shoreham, NY nuclear plant and Brookhaven National Laboratory has been saved for a science museum. Designed by his friend the famous architect Stanford White, perhaps its might be listed in a national register of historic places too, as many of Stanford White’s are. Years ago, the Suffolk County Archaeology Association considered it as a problem while I was there in grad school. An engineering student showed me the remains of Stanford White’s windmill, (125′ tall?) diagrammed in Scientific American as I recall, on his north shore estate near Stony Brook, NY where he also designed a small church in the “shingle style”. The windmill tower burned in the early 1960s a landmark for those on the waters of the Long Island Sound for many years. Maybe he helped therefore to design Tesla’s Tower. All that remains of the windmill are the cast in Baltimore iron stanchions once anchoring it to the ground, bulldozed over the “cliff”.

Soapy Smith

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Histarch Subject: New Book by Cathy Spude

The University of Oklahoma Press has just published my new book, “That Fiend in Hell”: Soapy Smith in Legend. Soapy Smith’s story is well-known to people who like popular culture, and those who are familiar with Alaskan history. As an anthropologist, I show how his legend grew out of the myth of the American West to make him a character the likes of Jesse James, Billy the Kid, and Wyatt Earp. That Fiend in Hell is an expose of how historic events are interpreted even at the time of their occurance within the social mileau of a culture’s understanding of their own value system. See http://www.oupress.com/ECommerce/Book/Detail/1686/that%20fiend%20in%20hell  for more information, or go to Amazon.com.
Catherine H. Spude, PhD

Congratulations! What a lot of work that must have been. I thought I heard of Soapy Smith perhaps in the stories of Colorado, of which “Myers Avenue: A Quick History of Cripple Creek’s Red Light District” by c) 1967 by Leland Feitz Library of Congress Catalog Card No 68-405 is one he might have been part of before leaving for Skagway, Alaska.

I enjoyed that summer 1980 out West through the ash of Mt. St. Helens on a Greyhound, a jet and then a small plane from Juneau to Skagway to work on Alaska’s first RR station and the Captain Moore Cabin. The airport there is better as seen in the recent Microsoft “Flight” a virtual Skagway geography along with the rest of Alaska and Hawaii.

I found this on Amazon and sent it to my Kindle, a scanned article from “Cassier’s Magazine” titled “Across the Chilkoot Pass by wire cable” from the Dyea tide and river side, found on microform in the Provincial Archives of British Columbia circa 1981 c) Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions. The funicular, “powered by rope or cable” was planned to go from Sheep Camp to Crater Lake, in contract, then “since” extended to a point known as Canyon Camp connecting with a surface road “running through the Dyea Canyon, and along the Dyea river, to the head of the tidewater thus making an uninterrupted transportation between Dyea and Crater Lake” “Later on” its author states “the cable system will, undoubtedly, be extended to Lake Linderman, the head of lake navigation”. (William Hewitt b. 1853 http://archive.org/details/cihm_15214)

It has many diagrams and pictures of its construction and how it developed. It shows a similar funicular system was used in New York state on “a wire rope tramway used by the Solvay Process Company at Syracuse, N.Y shows both wooden and iron supports”. I had the opportunity to ponder the Solvay location before they took the plant down. Interestingly the Solvay process of soda ash is named after a French sociologist! It’s reported a large amount of dynamite used in WWI was made there in the Split Rock quarries, and if the chemical fire, which ran out of water to control it, had jumped the creek, it would have leveled Syracuse with the disputed force of a small “atomic bomb” if the dynamite stored in small wooden barrels had caught fire. Albert Einstein disputed that in a letter, a researcher of the Solvay Plant had. The line had been “used for carrying lime rock from the Split Rock quarries to the soda ash works, at Geddes.” There are some problems with the scan however in getting some of the distances and numbers.

2010 Battle of the Atlantic Expedition

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration National Marine Sanctuaries

The Merchant Vessels: City of Atlanta

From some of the research I’ve managed to find out about its captain Leman Chapman Urquhart, born in Canada on Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick in the village of Castalia, it can be seen that he was not the regular captain of the ship. It had many previous captains, for a short time, according to the record read. The ship itself was laid down in 1903 in West Chester, Pennsylvania and I recall converted, perhaps during its construction, from coal to oil. He was my maternal grandfather’s brother, Lawrence George Urquhart’s older brother and other siblings grew up on the island, though in my grandfather’s time Lawrence enlisted in the Canadian Army fighting in Europe when he was, we hope, 16 (not 15). Leman C. Urquhart was a “Master Mariner” according to his business card and employed as a harbor pilot in the Savannah, Georgia harbor. They had both worked for “Savannah Lines” I think I recall him saying. My grandfather was later a crash-boat operator for flights out of New York near the current LaGuardia Airport. The City of Atlanta berthed in New York City and Savannah, Georgia making regular trips between the two cities. The NY Harbor-Sandy Hook Pilot’s Association thought, war declared, ships tied up in various rules and applications and perhaps having a harbor pilot as the captain, City of Atlanta may have an easier egress from the port of New York. Later correspondence about its wreckage stated since it was sunk purposefully to be a hazard to shipping, it may have been cleared by wire to some degree and is still cited as a hazard. The whole area off the North Carolina coast is a danger to magnetic compass bearings, warning on the navigation charts that anomalous magnetic readings are likely to be encountered.

At the base of a flagpole I recall is printed his name and other islanders who died for our freedom. We were then visiting the house my grandfather had bought in North Head, Grand Manan Island, N.B. As youngsters too young to travel much there, he later sold it to two school teachers on the island. The flagpole is just out-front of the church between two brass cannons, marked “Eccles”.

There is also a volume about the The Second Happy Time (Wikipedia) codenamed Operation Paukenschlag or: Operation Drumbeatbilled as “The Dramatic True Story of Germany’s First U-boat Attacks Along The American Coast In World War II,” by author: Michael Gannon, publisher: Harper Perennial in 1991 (review by Daryl Carpenter). Brought to their attention, perhaps “Lehman Urquart” that is the Leman Chapman Urquhart name will be corrected in the second edition.

Written by georgejmyersjr

07/15/2012 at 5:23 pm

The Fight To Create America’s Newest National Park

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“Since a part of my family is from Grand Manan Island, NB, and we used to spend some summers there I have also had the opportunity to, by van and train, to be in the Maine North Woods. They are beautiful and a part of our American legacy written by Henry David Thoreau. More well known for his living by Massachusetts’ Walden Pond, one might argue, his inspiration came from his travels in the White Mountains in New Hampshire and Mt Katahdin in Maine (Wikipedia). I vacationed near Lake Winnepeasauki, NH (“Smile of the Great Spirit”) in the foothills of the US NPS administered White Mountains and believe that the benefits outweigh any troubles, especially compared to the 1930s Fourth of July logging train fire that burned thousands of White Mountain acres, in the southern Presidential Range. They should have given that train the day off! And what a wonderful place the Maine North Woods are and the people nearby. Our neighbors in Quebec and New Brunswick, one might argue, would be attracted to time in a US National Park, the start (or finish) of the Appalachian Trail, through the East Coast’s highlands.”

THE FIGHT TO CREATE AMERICA’S NEWEST NATIONAL PARK – Outside magazine June 19, 2012

Written by georgejmyersjr

06/24/2012 at 7:56 am

Dear brother and sister:

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I haven’t actually joined ancestry.com but have had to use it and other sources for work I’ve done with Nancy particularly in the parts of three blocks in the "Bowery" named after Peter Stuyvesant’s Farm or in Dutch "bouwerie". I was just watching the horror film "The Descendant" (AKA:Bleeders) filmed on Grand Manan Island, it’s first and last known as "Hemoglobin" in the title and end credits, starring Rutger Hauer. I rented it from Amazon online then watch it through FIOS through the less than $100 Roku box when I want. Anyway I had been talking to Mom and called her up to say that whatever you might want to argue over "The Holland Society" in New York City has the family name "Myers" listed as part of the early settlers in New Amsterdam. The Holland Ave. I live on has nothing to do with that, named after a person, between two other persons "Hunt" and "Rhinelander".

I just jumped back over to ancestry.com, to see what I might have left there and they teased me with this document enclosed belonging to Lawrence George Urquhart, Mom’s dad from Grand Manan. It apparently has him signing up for WWI in Montreal, Quebec, which by the way most of the film was made there also, post-production and the staff, some Grand Mananers of course helped with the film, as noted in the credits as well as the "Production dog Shakespeare". I sometimes worried he may have been the youngest in it, apparently not though still somewhere between 15 and 19, the Canadian authorities have already cited the youngest at 16 and just over 16. However perhaps you can help me make out the date at the bottom?

If I have the time and "doe ray me" I might look further into what is on ancestry.com, which is still expanding, though my colleagues and I usually need more location info, i.e., address info and lots, than they have but seem to be slowly providing by acquiring it. Nothing like trying to figure out everyone that ever lived on a corner in the Bowery and if they were someone famous or so related. "City Directories" some years are like phone books (remember them?) listed by alphabetical names some years (every 10 years in NYC) by addresses. The "wrecking ball" is supposed to be illegal in NYC.

643389a

Written by georgejmyersjr

04/11/2012 at 2:55 pm

Memory Motel

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Dear Rolling Stones fans,
We’re gearing up to celebrate our fiftieth anniversary with a lot of exciting plans, and we’d appreciate your help with some of them.

Don’t have an image but an article was written in a compendium of essays, one by Leslie Fielder about “Altamont” back in 1974 or so in a Wesleyan University Press book. I had the pleasure of presenting it, but not having seen the film, in a “Seminar in the Arts” by Esther Schwartz at the newly opening Amherst Campus part of the Buffalo University in NY, just before you chaps went on tour and showed up.

Leslie Fielder was in the class, the point of the class to have a different artist from the Buffalo, NY area appear every week and discuss with the class their careers in the Arts. In “Residential Education” the class would assemble in a lounge, at the time, in a new residence hall built by I.M. Pei the Chinese-American architect, whose later new wing addition to the US National Gallery I had the pleasure to visit while excavating at Fort McHenry in Baltimore, MD, for the National Parks, where the “rockets red glare” and parachute flares illuminated the fort. A 10″ shell is reported to never have exploded outside the “bombproof” the officers latrine was attached to, “a two-seater” brick kidney, in a nice right triangle.

I missed the Buffalo concerts. I think it helped bring the place around a bit. I did enjoy the one concert in Madison Square Garden which I believe opened by Stevie Wonder, and looking at your gig records, Jimi Hendrix was visiting back stage. Check out the BBC recordings of Wonder on drums(?) and Hendrix on guitar(?) if you haven’t, I once heard on a jazz station up around Harriman, NY.

A “Between the Buttons” fan.

Written by georgejmyersjr

03/28/2012 at 12:48 pm

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