Red Ink and Rewrites Too

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Archive for the ‘Civil War’ Category

New Hampshire Emancipates 18th-Century Slaves

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New Hampshire Emancipates 18th-Century Slaves. A part of Portsmouth’s new African Burial Ground ceremony.

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Written by georgejmyersjr

06/07/2013 at 3:03 pm

The Great Civil War Lie

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NY Times: Disunion: One of the North’s worries was the ability of Great Britain to build large dangerous ships. One, in particular, the Scorpion class, with more modern cannon turrets vs. the deck mounted rails for large ordnance, was stopped, though two were built and later used by the British Navy as shown in Wikipedia. One built and completed, the CSS Alabama, created havoc in the Atlantic until finally sunk by the USS Kearsarge, off the coast of Cherbourg, France, where some of the Confederates are buried. The Union compelled the designer/owner of what became known as the submarine "Alligator" to be used and ordered up the James River to Appomattox, though then lower water levels wouldn’t allow it to submerge, perhaps a possible fleet of them served as a warning to other nations. Reparations in Switzerland amounted to over $20 million, fined for the construction of the CSS Alabama I’ve read after the Civil War. The "Alligator" also sunk off of Cape Hatteras, NC, as did the USS Monitor, and is being searched for as part of the inventory of the more recent "Battle of the Atlantic".

Antitem: America’s Bloodiest Day

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My favorite memory of Antietam is of the cannon fired and the imagined line of smoking artillery on both sides. Some set fire to the woods to kill the enemy, burning them horrifically. I worked at Fort McHenry “National Shrine”, with a flint-knapper from Maryland. It had had its cannons pointed at the city of Baltimore “to discourage Southern sympathizers” rather than the harbor, Robert E. Lee’s reputed designed steam pile-driver had built the hexagonal Fort Carroll to protect the Baltimore harbor further out, today nearby the Francis Scott Key Bridge. The flint-knapper made “gun-flints” of grey chert from Texas for sale in the National Park, sold as replicas to discourage looting of the battlefield. For a time, Mr. Lee was commandant of West Point Military Academy and lived in a house archeology has tested in Fort Hamilton, Brooklyn, a street there named so. There’s a story that his son was a hostage in nearby Fort Lafayette, now an underwater site, dynamited for the eastern pier of the Verrazzano Bridge. NY Times OpionatorAmerica’s Bloodiest Day” 

Written by georgejmyersjr

09/21/2012 at 10:00 pm

NY Times: Opinionator: Why Shiloh Matters

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My grand-dad Lawrence Urquhart served on the S.S. Beauregard which I recall was on the Lend-Lease "Murmansk run" convoy to aid Russia when his brother, as captain of the S.S. City of Atlanta, was lost with 40+ crew and passengers on the way from NYC to Savannah, Georgia, sunk by U-123 in "Operation Drumbeat". I once, working on the archeology of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Barge Canal, had the opportunity to visit nearby Shiloh from MS. I have also worked in the Cold Spring, NY periphery of the West Point Foundry and would like to point out that the "cannonballs" atop the rifled R.P. Parrott vertical cannon in the tribute to "Col. Everett Peabody" were never actually part of the cannon. It fired a shell with a brass "sabot" or foot to impart the twist of the barrel "rifling" and contained incendiary, perhaps, as used in the "Swamp Angel" bombardment of Charleston, South Carolina, also noted in poem, one by Herman Melville. Perhaps added later, and not actually used in the battle. I’ve also read that the origin of American "protest folk music" in music history began with this horrendous battle. Comment submitted: “Why Shiloh Matters” – Winston Groom, April 6. 2012

The President and His General – NYTimes.com

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The President and His General – NYTimes.com: Or other relationships. I was told by the Robert Gardiner, descendant of Julia Gardiner, married to former President Tyler, that she had had a vision and rode all night from Tidewater to Richmond to see her husband, in charge of Richmond, before she thought he would die. He was very mad she had, and the following day collapsed on the Hotel steps. Both sides, out of respect for the former First Lady, allowed her grieving entourage to pass back to New York, where her father had been the US Senator, who perished with others when the "Peacemaker" cannon, forged in NYC, exploded on the USS Princeton, passing and fired in salute to Washington’s Mount Vernon above the Potomac River. She is sometimes referred to as the prettiest, married at 19, after meeting widow President Tyler, fortunately below decks, when the large cannon exploded.

Opinionator: NY Times: The Disunion: Unconditional Surrender

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My grandfather, a US Merchant Mariner, served on the USS General Buckner, a P2 troop carrier. The ship was cut in half in NJ and lengthened to take a full complement of US Marines. Buckner Bay was the first US occupation of Japan. A training area at West Point Military Academy is also named after him I saw on an archeology survey after Hurricane Floyd hit, toppling trees. He used to joke they ran out of admirals’ names and had to start naming them after generals. NY Times link

Written by georgejmyersjr

02/17/2012 at 4:47 pm

Sherman’s Southern Sympathies – Comment – NY Times

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Abraham Lincoln, though he fought in the Blackhawk War is considered by many historians to be no great military general and had relied on the inexperienced. One thing I read was that Sherman changed the nature of "war" i.e., against property rather than people. One property he did not (perhaps) find, was the large powder mill about 30 miles outside Atlanta, erected from London, England Crystal Palace brochures, by a Hudson River foundry owner, perhaps tired of the contracts that all went to the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, New York across the river from the US Military Academy. It’s where the patented R.P. Parrott rifled cannons were cast (6-pdr to 300-pdr) and figured significantly in range and destruction in the civil war. West Point Foundry is also cited as the first site of a "labor action" in a Federal facility, perhaps "federalized" once the war was declared said to have been run with clandestine iron-workers from Great Britain. It’s currently been archaeologically investigated, in part over NIKE missile battery contaminants, i.e., nickel, cadmium, in Foundry Cove next to Constitution Island.

Civil War | The New York Times
http://www.facebook.com/nytimescivilwar

Written by georgejmyersjr

01/20/2012 at 12:14 am

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