Red Ink and Rewrites Too

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Archive for the ‘Gardiners Island’ Category

The President and His General – NYTimes.com

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The President and His General – NYTimes.com: Or other relationships. I was told by the Robert Gardiner, descendant of Julia Gardiner, married to former President Tyler, that she had had a vision and rode all night from Tidewater to Richmond to see her husband, in charge of Richmond, before she thought he would die. He was very mad she had, and the following day collapsed on the Hotel steps. Both sides, out of respect for the former First Lady, allowed her grieving entourage to pass back to New York, where her father had been the US Senator, who perished with others when the "Peacemaker" cannon, forged in NYC, exploded on the USS Princeton, passing and fired in salute to Washington’s Mount Vernon above the Potomac River. She is sometimes referred to as the prettiest, married at 19, after meeting widow President Tyler, fortunately below decks, when the large cannon exploded.

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The North of the South – Readers’ Comments – NYTimes.com

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The North of the South – Readers’ Comments – NYTimes.com: “Robert David Lion Gardiner, last ‘lord of the manor’ of Gardiners Island, in Suffolk County, New York was related to the former First Lady, Julia Gardiner, the second wife of the former President John Tyler. He was said to be ‘in charge’ of Richmond, VA during the Civil War. Mr. Gardiner said that his great-aunt, said to have been the prettiest of all of First Lady’s, had a dream that John Tyler would soon die, one night while at their estate in Tidewater Virginia. She rode a horse through the night and met him on the steps of the hotel used as the Confederate headquarters and heard his consternation for traveling in such dangerous circumstances. He died though, shortly afterwards and Mr. Gardiner said both sides held up the hostilities to allow the grieving former First Lady Julia Tyler (nee Gardiner) and her entourage to cross the battleground and return to New York where her father had been the US Senator for New York. He and others had been killed on the USS Princeton when an experimental gun, the so-called ‘Peacemaker’ exploded in salute of Washington’s Mount Vernon in passing on the Potomac River. That event had literally thrown the widowed President Tyler together with the young Julia Gardiner, in a national tragic mourning for a number of people. She would later live her life on Staten Island after a much publicized court case over a contestable will, setting precedent, named large properties in Manhattan, thought scandalously changed. Ironically, I suppose, Mr. Gardiner related, he served in naval intelligence in WWII aboard a newer USS Princeton, and related of denying when in law school, of being ‘that Gardiner’.”

Written by georgejmyersjr

01/25/2011 at 6:13 pm

Universal Studios Streets Of Fire – The Phoenix Project Pt II – Rebirth «

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Astounding! Breathless! A “piece of the action” and a new “Dick Tracy”? Maybe they could work in a Columbia University dissertation found in Gloria Swanson’s collection at the Harry Ransom Center, at The University of Texas at Austin: Raymond Witham Daum (archivist, Gloria Swanson Archives, 1980-1982) Dissertation (Columbia Univ.), 1976, “A Film Study of Some Aspects of Urban and Rural Communities of a Twentieth Century American Indian Group: The Mohawks of Caughnawaga and New York City” and 2″ Video, 1 item, “To Be an Indian” dedicated to Gloria Swanson, 55 min. How about “Under A Killing Moon”? or work in the “top offs” that native Mohawks in the past had when the steel work was finished on the skyscraper or other structure they work on. Looks ready for its closeup.

Robert Gardiner, a last direct descendant of the Gardiner’s Island Manor, the last intact one in North America, told me once that Gloria Swanson once told him she said it would take a “Vivian Leigh” to play his great-aunt’s story, First Lady Julia Gardiner Tyler, a very young bride of an “old” President, after her father, US Senator Gardiner, two Cabinet members and others perished after the “Peacemaker” exploded saluting George Washington’s Mount Vernon on the Potomac River on the USS Princeton, the modern one he served on in WWII. The “Peacemaker” was cast in an “English” forge, at least they affected that in their elaborate crest on their carriages he said, on the West-side of Manhattan, which was once archaeologically tested, for Donald Trump’s proposed “TV City” in a company I worked for. It was where the largest crankshaft single casting for an ocean going vessel’s engine was once made, and the first as a “freebie” if it proved viable, “out-ranging” most cannon of the time, as the British Navy once did in the bombardment of Fort McHenry in the War of 1812.

How about a film about “The Rose Of Long Island”? The “Siege of Richmond” actually stopped long enough, after former President Tyler, for the Confederacy, died in Richmond, Virginia, she had ridden all night having a vision of his passing on, and shooting on both sides stopped long enough for her entourage to cross lines out of respect for the death. She returned to New York City, where she later lived on Staten Island. She was also involved in a large lawsuit over a contested will, involving large properties in Manhattan, which became a law school question for Robert Gardiner he denied though it referred to his surname. Wills had not generally been contested before.

Sorry, I got carried away…Captain Kidd’s treasure was dug up by the British in the end of the 19th century from Gardiner’s Island, he according to one historian, “the most maligned character in history” as Captain Kidd had a map on his person when hung and it was before there was a USA, all criminals property is property of the Crown, Mr. Gardiner told me he had researched in England. I heard it was used, an India’s princess’s dowry, to build a seaman’s hospital and home in London, England on PBS.

Written by georgejmyersjr

05/31/2010 at 10:36 pm

Texas board approves social studies standards that perceived liberal bias

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Washington Post – Texas board approves social studies standards that perceived liberal bias: “Texas was last to be readmitted post US Civil War 1870. First Lady Julia Gardiner Tyler (her dad, US Sen. Gardiner of Gardiner’s I., NY, was killed when ‘Peacemaker’ cannon exploded on the USS Princeton along with 2 Cabinet members and others) strongly lobbied for its statehood. Later she was a Staten Island, NY resident (so was Santa Ana, remember the Alamo?) after former President Tyler died in Richmond, VA for the Confederacy. Ironically, when a problem was discovered in Cold Spring, NY, from the production of nickel-cadmium batteries for the NIKE anti-missile system, next to the former West Point Foundry location, the former plant was filled with new textbooks that had to be either cleaned or burned, I would hope of the contaminants. The plant is gone but Foundry Cove marsh, after dammed, dredged and hauled out on the old Civil War railbed is returning.  5/22/2010 7:45:51 PM”

Written by georgejmyersjr

05/23/2010 at 12:23 am

Scotland’s global impact conference

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Scotland’s global impact conference

Eden Court Theatre, Inverness
22 – 24 October 2009

The earliest property maps from Scotland to survive are of seaweed harvest areas along its coast. It is called “dulse” today and is harvested in Maine, USA and Grand Manan Island, New Brunswick, Canada. Some, the lousier of the seaweed, goes into animal feed supplements, containing many minerals and trace elements, it’s been assayed. Hand harvested at times of lower cyclic tides due to the Moon, and some of the “highest” tides in the world, it’s spread out for the sun to dry on large rocks or nets and turned over, till most of the water has left the “purple” or red seaweed. Spreading it requires that it loosely connect to other pieces making the turning over a little easier than piece by piece. When I helped pick it we dried it from the dory full of burlap sacks, on Indian Beach where there are many large cobbles from ostrich egg size to almost basketball size sea-rounded rock cobbles on the Grand Manan Channel, the chart of which is used as wallpaper in the “Men” restrooms at the “Red Lobster” restaurant “chain”.

New seal on the wall…

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Years ago I met Leon Shenandoah who was the “ta-dah-deh-ho” “chief of chiefs” of the Iroquois and had a cup of sassafras tea at archaeologist Joel Grossman’s loft in Manhattan, his grand-daughter the now famous Native singer. Maybe he was. She said his name also meant “head full of snakes” which maybe how the term “Iroquois” got started…derogatory French…the Algonquins once called them “real adders”. I think that wasn’t the Shinnecock also Algonquian, whose seal they put up with the seals of the seven incorporated villages on the Southampton Town wall the other day.

Later, I think a new “chief of chiefs” was Oren Lyons who spoke at a Syracuse U. commencement. I met him too once outside Grossman’s office on 16th St. and Third Ave., he was on his way to testify at the United Nation’s commission on the rights of indigenous peoples.

“Fat Tuesdays” across the street is where Les Paul used to play and they had this moving hologram of Dizzy Gillespie, as you walked by he would lower his trademark horn and smile as you looked back. Never seen a hologram again quite like it. Scheffel Hall it was once called and the author O. Henry (from the demolished Ohio Penitentiary…they think in Austin, Texas) William Sydney Porter used to frequent and write.

The Secret in the Cellar, is a Webcomic based on an authentic forensic case of a recently discovered 17th Century body. Using graphics, photos, and online activities, the Webcomic unravels a mystery of historical, and scientific importance. – Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Seriously, What Are the Odds? – Dick Cavett Blog – NYTimes.com

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An East End synchronicity story came from now deceased Robert David Lion Gardiner of Gardiners Island. During the American Civil War, former President John Tyler was in charge of Richmond, Virginia, under siege by the Union. His young wife Julia Gardiner whom he met when the NYC “Hogg and Delamater” cast “Peacemaker” cannon exploded, on the S.S. Princeton, on the Potomac River below Mount Vernon, killing her father US Senator Gardiner and others. The former First Lady had a dream of Tyler’s death on their plantation in Tidewater Virginia. She got on horseback and rode all night to see if he was alright. She met him and he died that day on the steps of the hotel where he was in charge of that city. The siege hostilities ceased long enough for the grieving former First Lady and her entourage to pass through the Union lines as she traveled back to NYC, where later she was involved in a well-publicized precedent setting “changed will” case involving expensive Manhattan real estate.

Seriously, What Are the Odds? – Dick Cavett Blog – NYTimes.com

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Written by georgejmyersjr

05/10/2009 at 10:41 pm

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