Red Ink and Rewrites Too

Duplicates online comments, to keep track.

Archive for the ‘linguistics’ Category

Why You Should Read This Book – Economist – Marilyn Monroe?

leave a comment »

At “Dangerous Minds” awhile ago, is a link in China to the film version with Milo O’Shea as Leopold Bloom, Ulysses (1967). In one scene, he has a dream, and as Mayor of Dublin, gives the “Vulcan salute” (from the Hebrew ceremony also used by “Spock” Leonard Nimoy in the Star Trek franchise, to say LLAP “Live long and prosper”). It helped re-explain the novel, having seen a number of stage productions (2) of “Ulysses in Night Town” after attempting a too young an age to read it. “Portrait of an artist, as an Old Man” (“Catch-22” author Joseph Heller’s last novel) and various other combinations of that James Joyce work, beg to differ with a selective criticism of the novel mistakenly published as of the work of Matisse about Homer (New York, 1935). Economist

Unpublished comment to: Beyond Guantánamo, a Web of Prisons for Terrorism Inmates : NY Times

leave a comment »

Religion protects families. Families are about kinship. Social anthropology studies the different kinship structures that different people have, i.e. "uncle" or "aunt" may mean something different within different societies and may be quite different from culture to culture in comparison. I once attended a CUNY grad lecture on the preference for "cross-cousin marriage" in nomadic peoples of the deserts. There your preferred though not necessarily ones mate, would be "a child of one’s mother’s brother or father’s sister" which the speaker thought was a way of keeping widely separated people together when marriages were proposed. Recent data has shown that "cousin" marriages are also very fertile producing many children. Perhaps religion attempts to provide a "survival of the fittest" society in its proscription and divorce, i.e., three witnesses required for infidelity grounds in Islamic law in the Philippines. These ideas and culture have to be understood further as not a threat to our ways and means to ends.

Beyond Guantánamo, a Web of Prisons for Terrorism Inmates – NYTimes.com

Written by georgejmyersjr

12/12/2011 at 11:03 am

Photographers revisit 9/11; ‘It was that horrific’ – msnbc

leave a comment »

George Myers-150923

"Chuck" Scarborough of WNBC in NYC said a day or two before the 9/11 ceremony, that instead of a day of remembrance perhaps it should remain a day of "infamy". It makes sense to apply it so, though I think it also requires we remember that there may be other information we need to know. In regards to the attack on Pearl Harbor the honorable Senator from Arkansas, Hattie Ophelia Wyatt Caraway, thought too "gut reaction", decided not to vote for the declaration of war after the attack, so stating in her speech, which required some research and "archaeology" to retrieve in the late 1980s. I looked at a researcher’s work at The Mainichi Daily News, the Japanese press, him or her, not Japanese, who was surprised how little research was done by both countries in regards to the time immediately preceding that WWII "infamy". In that research a translation of a "declaration of war" was never transcribed as the Japanese transcribers were at a funeral "outside the beltway" on an unusually warm December day and the pastor’s eulogy went on for over two hours, the research asserts. I imagine therefore some other history might have occurred, long story short. In any case, we need better language translations, I’m given to understand we still have less than the digits on our hands for Arabic in the FBI.

– Tue Sep 13, 2011 10:57 AM EDT

Written by georgejmyersjr

09/13/2011 at 3:57 pm

New York State Museum Archaeology Programs Targeted

leave a comment »

I have recently learned that the New York State Education Department and the New York State Museum are effectively gutting their century plus old archaeology program. State Archaeologist; curator of archaeology; and the curator of historic archaeology, were all served layoff notices effective in three weeks unless their union negotiates a contract settlement. I have heard that NY State Museum administration was not consulted on the layoff plan nor were they informed until the layoff notices were served.

I am sort of a lurking archaeologist, my BA degree in anthropology as well as doctoral prep, though archaeology providing the wherewithal mostly to pursue higher education and thought to elaborate on some “connections” in the NY State Archaeology program I’ve happened across on which someone else might expand.

In “The NY Times” article “Edmund Carpenter, Restless Scholar, Dies at 88” (July 8, 2011 http://nyti.ms/nC6jW5) he an “…archaeologist and anthropologist who, impatient with traditional boundaries between disciplines, did groundbreaking work in anthropological filmmaking and ethnomusicology and, with his friend Marshall McLuhan, laid the foundations of modern media studies, died on July 1 in Southampton, N.Y. He was 88.”

It also refers: “At 13 he met Arthur C. Parker, a Seneca anthropologist and director of the Rochester Museum and Science Center, who invited him to take part in excavations of prehistoric Iroquoian sites.” Arthur C. Parker (Seneca “snow snake” a North Woods winter game) would become one of New York’s important State Archaeologists, whose records we still use to decide the likelihood of prehistoric and historic resources that require additional protection.

I was quite surprised to learn that Mr. Parker’s sister, “Birdie” Parker also a noted anthropologist of native materials and ethnology was married to “Iron Eyes Cody” the actor who played many native roles in the Hollywood films, and left a lasting impression on keeping America clean by shedding a tear on camera as a public service announcement. In many films (i.e. Crazy Horse in the film “Sitting Bull”) I happened to meet him at a Choctaw Pow-wow in 1979 when he was grieving for his wife, who had just passed on.

It seems a shame that New York’s heritage, which is more often than not connected to the world outside New York, would be jeopardized by what many with many millions today, would see as a small sum of funds used for the greater good, its people.

Not necessarily the views of my employers. – posted to histarch

Written by georgejmyersjr

07/09/2011 at 8:15 pm

Huge dictionary project completed after 90 years – Physorg.com

leave a comment »

Huge dictionary project completed after 90 years

An ambitious project to identify, explain and provide citations for the words written in cuneiform on clay tablets and carved in stone by Babylonians, Assyrians and others in Mesopotamia between 2500 B.C. and A.D. 100 has been completed after 90 years of labor, the University of Chicago announced June 5.

Comment: Maybe we’ll someday discover the capital of Mitanni, Washshukkanni, which in the 15th century BCE, “emerged as a world power and the equal of Egypt and Babylonia” (“Nuzi and the Hurrians” Semitic Museum, Harvard University online) I studied for a short time one of its city excavations, ancient Nuzi (modern Yorghan Tepe) excavated by Starr of Harvard University, with Elizabeth Stone, PhD of Stony Brook University, who was trying to help train the Iraqis get artifacts back and who want their museum, sacked in a coalition “oversight”, in Baghdad, restored. She had specialized in ancient women’s rights and organizations in ancient times. I read sadly since 2003, they may have even less today, local Iraqi militias now in charge with their own laws.

Written by georgejmyersjr

06/09/2011 at 2:43 pm

It’s Time for the Peace Corps Administration to Wake Up and Reform

leave a comment »

Every Peace Corps volunteer affects an other American. I applied everywhere but Korea, my uncle went into the Army at 31, and, with an anthropolo­gy degree, offered to inoculate Koreans for TB. Since, a former President was jailed. I find it hard to believe a Korean couldn’t do so. Back to square one, where I work in American archaeolog­y and another story.

The Peace Corps thought it might be good to assist the archaeolog­y of the then declared independent Belize in the Mayan culture area on the Yucatan peninsula. I was told a number of people were accepted and shipped there according to a former Stony Brook University classmate. As it turned out, the person in charge of the antiquitie­s for that country, a trusted archaeolog­ist thought the idea a bad one. At the time a terrible civil war was also being fought in nearby Guatemala which has finally ended.

In both cases, and by the way it’s been found that UV light emitters in heating and cooling ducts of large structures is very effective in killing airborne TB bacteria, i.e. in shopping malls, government buildings, etc., that with the proper planning these ideas are good, but need better planning and review and are still important for the work in peace. Tried again, with somewhat different objectives would work. Once upon a time it was stated the Peace Corps were only accepting beekeepers­. Hope they helped the bees.

My condolence­s to the Shrivers, their kin and friends. Read the Article at HuffingtonPost

Written by georgejmyersjr

01/25/2011 at 9:18 pm

Troops’ gravestones have Pentagon slogans

leave a comment »

AP – ARLINGTON, Virginia – Unlike earlier wars, nearly all Arlington National Cemetery gravestones for troops killed in Iraq or Afghanistan are inscribed with the slogan-like operation names the Pentagon selected to promote public support for the conflicts.” Link

Dee Dee’s Mom was named Arlington (wouldn’t be her Dad would it?)

Written by georgejmyersjr

08/24/2005 at 3:53 am

%d bloggers like this: